Turning Points

When the group decided to work together, we felt we had reached a turning point in our quilting lives! Our first collection sought to reflect our individual thoughts on what a turning point could be. A common size was agreed but the theme was freely interpreted.


Pat Archibald

African Enigma

This piece represents a personal turning point in my life when the mismatched and random pieces of the jigsaw of life started to fit together after an adventurous climb to the crater rim of Africa’s highest mountain.

African Enigma


Joyce Watson

Ephemeral Seasons

The probability of the effect of global warming, causing the disruption or disappearance of our seasons, prompted this recording. It represents the cycle of our seasons as we presently know them.

Constructed mostly in paper (which itself has a limited life).

Ephemeral Seasons


Mary Ennis

Turning Spheres

This design represents turning spheres in the skies. Whether stars, planets or satellites, they modify the space around them by fire, light, colour or movement.

I have used hand-dyed silks, cotton, silk velvet, felt, wool, bondaweb, supermend, fabric adhesive….in fact all available materials. The work is machine pieced and quilted.

Turning Spheres


Margaret Morrow

Stone Wall at Sunset

This quilt depicts a wall from the old barn we converted into our new home.

The quilt was layered up and quilted around the outlines of the stone shapes with cotton thread. The textures and colours of the sun setting on the stones was simulated by painting individual pieces of Tyvek, which were then heated to distort them. The distorted pieces were then stitched to the quilted background.

Stone Wall at Sunset


Margaret O’Gorman

Vortex

When a point turns repeatedly it creates a vortex that can be seen as a whirlpool or whirlwind, swallowing up everything that approaches. This is what happens in my mind’s journey to making a quilt. Visual stimuli of architecture, sculpture, paintings, colours in the garden are all absorbed and whirl around until the final turning point is reached and clarity wins. I can then commit my thoughts to fabric.

Vortex


Jan Watson

Turning Tail

Moving back to the West Coast from Edinburgh after 13 years was a personal turning point. New job, new husband, new home, new culture! My design represents the coastal map of the Clyde estuary where I now live. The title refers to the “Tail of the Bank” which has been a literal turning point into the Atlantic for seamen and emigrants for centuries.

The juxtaposition of the sea and the land has been deliberately confused using mostly hand-dyed cottons in shades of grey and brown and raw edge appliqué.

Turning Tail