Castings and Turnings

Pat Archibald

Celtic Wheel

My piece depicts the invention of the wheel and, as a result, the early organisation of trade and industry in The Bronze Age. On the left hand side of the panel copper and tin are being heated to form the alloy bronze, which is then poured and cast to turn into beautiful never-ending Celtic designs.

The fabrics used are 100% cotton. The piece is embellished with copper and gold foils and a new product – ‘Hot Ribbon’ – is used to outline areas and some of the freeform Celtic patterning.

Celtic Wheel


Alison Drayson

Rust

Inspired by the rusting winches which are abandoned all over coastal areas, this quilt has a background of my own rusted fabric, with fused hand-dyed and commercial fabrics. It is free machine quilted using a variety of threads.

Rust


Mary Ennis

Wordless Chronicle

Classical Greek sculpture provided the source for this work. The bronze shield, now housed in the archaeological museum in Delphi, dates back to the 7th century BC. The cables came from decoration on the remains of a column at Ephesus.

I have used hand-dyed silk noil to capture the textures of ancient bronze and stone fragments. Foiling with copper, one of the main components of bronze, enhances the metallic quality of the artefact. The piece is stitched by machine and incorporates reverse appliqué, trapunto and corded quilting.

Wordless Chronicle


Margaret Morrow

The Furnace

The specific amounts of ore that go into the furnace then mix in the tremendous heat and turn into liquid cast iron and then cool in the black sand mould to become a finished piece. The heat changes it all. Harmony.

The Furnace


Margaret O’Gorman

Arabesque

The design for this quilt was inspired by patterns found in a Victorian fountain and floor grating both of which were made of cast iron.

The quilt is made of cotton which as been hand dyed, painted and quilted by machine.

Arabesque


Jan Watson

Chanin

Inspired by the bronze gates to the executive offices in the Chanin Building, one of New York’s finest examples of Art Deco architecture. The gates represent the greatness of the city – its art, its commerce and its dynamism. The gears signify New York’s industrial prominence.

Chanin


Joyce Watson

Cast Aside

Scotland’s heavy industry is a thing of the past, usurped by hi-tec silicon chips. Here, cogs, sprockets and castings lie, beginning to rust, awaiting an uncertain future.

Worked in appliqué, planned to give a 3-dimensional look. Heavily machined to emphasise a feeling of depth. Painted and distressed bondaweb rust.

Cast Aside